GeneralCLINICAL PRACTICE

Utilizing the Four Tenets of Osteopathic Medicine as an intersectional framework for approaching sexual orientation and gender identity disclosure as a provider

Timothy L. Counce, Jr, OMS III; Amy Ko, OMS III; Anthony D. Martinez, OMS III; Jenna M. Rivera, OMS III; Carol Browne, DO; and Linda Solis, PhD
Notes and Affiliations
Notes and Affiliations

Received: November 16, 2020

Accepted: July 1, 2021

Published: September 22, 2021

  • Timothy L. Counce, Jr, OMS III, 

    University of the Incarnate Word School of Osteopathic Medicine, San Antonio, TX, USA

  • Amy Ko, OMS III, 

    University of the Incarnate Word School of Osteopathic Medicine, San Antonio, TX, USA

  • Anthony D. Martinez, OMS III, 

    University of the Incarnate Word School of Osteopathic Medicine, San Antonio, TX, USA

  • Jenna M. Rivera, OMS III, 

    University of the Incarnate Word School of Osteopathic Medicine, San Antonio, TX, USA

  • Carol Browne, DO, 

    University of the Incarnate Word School of Osteopathic Medicine, San Antonio, TX, USA

  • Linda Solis, PhD, 

    University of the Incarnate Word School of Osteopathic Medicine, San Antonio, TX, USA

J Osteopath Med; 121(12): 875-881
Abstract

The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex, and other (LGBTQI+) community continues to experience health inequity and unmet needs. This manuscript examines the application of the Four Tenets of Osteopathic Medicine (FTOM) during a patient’s self-disclosure of their sexual orientation and/or gender identity to the provider, also known as coming out. Tenet One discusses the interplay between intersectionality and coming out. Tenet Two elucidates how coming out moves toward a balance of homeostasis and self-healing. Tenet Three examines how structure and function can be understood on a personal level and how society influences coming out. Tenet Four explains the resources available to facilitate the previously forementioned changes. By applying the Four Tenets, the provider may more readily understand what “coming out” means on personal and social levels and what implications they may have on their patients’ health.

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