Obstetrics/GynecologyORIGINAL ARTICLE

Effect of visceral manipulation on menstrual complaints in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome

Mahitab M. Yosri, PT, PhD; Hamada A. Hamada, PT, PhD; and Amel M. Yousef, PT, PhD
Notes and Affiliations
Notes and Affiliations

Received: October 25, 2021

Accepted: February 2, 2022

Published: May 2, 2022

  • Mahitab M. Yosri, PT, PhD, 

    Women’s Health Department, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt

  • Hamada A. Hamada, PT, PhD, 

    Department of Biomechanics, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt

  • Amel M. Yousef, PT, PhD, 

    Women’s Health Department, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt

Abstract

Context: Research is lacking regarding osteopathic approaches in treating polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), one of the prevailing endocrine abnormalities in reproductive-aged women. Limited movement of pelvic organs can result in functional and structural deficits, which can be resolved by applying visceral manipulation (VM).

Objectives: This study aims to analyze the effect of VM on dysmenorrhea, irregular, delayed, and/or absent menses, and premenstrual symptoms in PCOS patients.

Methods: Thirty Egyptian women with PCOS, with menstruation-related complaints and free from systematic diseases and/or adrenal gland abnormalities, prospectively participated in a single-blinded, randomized controlled trial. They were recruited from the women’s health outpatient clinic in the faculty of physical therapy at Cairo University, with an age of 20–34 years, and a body mass index (BMI) ≥25, <30 kg/m2. Patients were randomly allocated into two equal groups (15 patients); the control group received a low-calorie diet for 3 months, and the study group that received the same hypocaloric diet added to VM to the pelvic organs and their related structures, according to assessment findings, for eight sessions over 3 months. Evaluations for body weight, BMI, and menstrual problems were done by weight-height scale, and menstruation-domain of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Health-Related Quality of Life Questionnaire (PCOSQ), respectively, at baseline and after 3 months from interventions. Data were described as mean, standard deviation, range, and percentage whenever applicable.

Results: Of 60 Egyptian women with PCOS, 30 patients were included, with baseline mean age, weight, BMI, and menstruation domain score of 27.5 ± 2.2 years, 77.7 ± 4.3 kg, 28.6 ± 0.7 kg/m2, and 3.4 ± 1.0, respectively, for the control group, and 26.2 ± 4.7 years, 74.6 ± 3.5 kg, 28.2 ± 1.1 kg/m2, and 2.9 ± 1.0, respectively, for the study group. Out of the 15 patients in the study group, uterine adhesions were found in 14 patients (93.3%), followed by restricted uterine mobility in 13 patients (86.7%), restricted ovarian/broad ligament mobility (9, 60%), and restricted motility (6, 40%). At baseline, there was no significant difference (p>0.05) in any of demographics (age, height), or dependent variables (weight, BMI, menstruation domain score) among both groups. Poststudy, there was a statistically significant reduction (p=0.000) in weight, and BMI mean values for the diet group (71.2 ± 4.2 kg, and 26.4 ± 0.8 kg/m2, respectively) and the diet + VM group (69.2 ± 3.7 kg; 26.1 ± 0.9 kg/m2, respectively). For the improvement in the menstrual complaints, a significant increase (p<0.05) in the menstruation domain mean score was shown in diet group (3.9 ± 1.0), and the diet + VM group (4.6 ± 0.5). On comparing both groups poststudy, there was a statistically significant improvement (p=0.024) in the severity of menstruation-related problems in favor of the diet + VM group.

Conclusions: VM yielded greater improvement in menstrual pain, irregularities, and premenstrual symptoms in PCOS patients when added to caloric restriction than utilizing the low-calorie diet alone in treating that condition.

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